Monday, June 12, 2006

Revision

A few weeks ago, a good portion of the students weren't feeling too great. A bunch of us had just had the mid-term for our Consultation Skills class, the one we have at 8 am, right before WOM. We'd been busy memorizing all sorts of hierarchies and models, and all of them seemed logical enough that we could come up with them by ourselves. Instead, someone else came up with them first, and so we have to spend our summer memorizing the terminology and structure they decided on. At least by our WOM class, for good or bad, the evil mid-term was over.
As part of our WOM class on that Wednesday, we were going over the levels of involvement to on-line buzz. This was a change from my consulting class: the professor who came up with these wasn't some guy I'd never meet. It was my professor. These were Dr. Walter Carl's Levels of Involvement(pdf). That alone made them more accessible, but as we talked about them, the class decided monitoring, listening, and joining in (the three levels Dr. Carl presented) may not completely cover the various levels of involvement. So we added a level between listening and joining in: responding. We then talked about how many companies are oblivious to WOM in general, so the lowest level should be oblivious. So now the hierarchy we agreed upon was oblivious, monitoring, listening, responding, and joining in.
This was not some arbitrary scale given to us by a text book and some random teachers; this was a hierarchy that we as a class discussed, worked out, and agreed upon. Instead of just memorizing what other people tell us in this class, we are coming up with out own frameworks. This is an aspect of the class I particularly like: the field of study is so uncharted, that not only are we students, but we are also teachers. Why else would people read our blog?

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8 comments:

tanyak said...

I agree. That is an aspect of the class that I love as well. I also love that because it is so uncharted, and so few people are avidly involved so far in WOM marketing, the people we learn about in class and their theories- we get to meet. All three of our text books cite each other repeatedly. And our books also cite our guest speakers that we've had. It makes the class so much more interesting when you read about a theory or program and then the creator of it comes to our classroom to explain it to us first hand.
It also makes it a lot easier to remember when you can pair a theory with a face and personality.

JStephens said...

I agree as well. It's better to study subjects from the mind of the professor. I hate getting text books which site models from the mid 1900's in which we still use today. Hasn't someone thought of anything better in the last 50 years? That's what's good about WOM. Even if it's not Dr. Carl's own research, it definitely came within the last few years and I guarantee Dr. Carl at least knows that person. It seems like an industry for the up and coming generation. Most of the CEOs and guest speakers we have heard from are generally younger in age, and it appears WOM geared towards us.

NUlax17 said...

I had comments of my own, but it looks like everyone has already agreed on the same things. Not to be monotonous, but it takes the educational aspect of the class to a new level when you are talking to someone (Dr. Carl) who is actively involved in the creation and dissemination of WOM principles and theories professionally. WOM is from the past, new to the present, but is likely to drive the future... it's cool to be a part of the organization of the future of WOM.

somerso said...

I'll be the one to sound like a broken record, but I agree. As Prof. Carl even said the first day of class, this is one of the first WOM classes at a University, so even though the research and concepts we are learning are relatively new, we are also helping to impact the industry. As far as I'm concerned, education isnt about memorizing vocabulary and exactly what a professor rambles in class. Its about taking those ramblings and information and questioning their existence. We've been able to do this in this class and it makes the content engaging and interesting to learn. Job well done....

KERandall said...

As everyone has said, I too agree with ericrocksmyworld that this collaboration was extremely effective. This is one of the reasons I enjoy this class. I feel like I am "ahead of the game" in that I am studying something that is still evolving. This exercise with Dr. Carl almost made me feel powerful, if that makes sense. I actually felt like this is the first time in my educational career where I am contributing to something intellectual instead of just regurgitating information... In consultation skills we would explain this as moving past the knowledge recall level of cognitive abilities... I also enjoy this class because industry professionals come in and speak with us. I appreciate how they actually pay attention to our comments and answer every question with extreme detail and care.

Kennie Swanson said...

Yes, I know I am like number 1 million and 43 to have commented on this post, but i really think it's a great insight. Also, I can't tell you how much i hate being fed all of these theories and models that anyone of us could have come up with. Does Maslow's hierarchy of needs ring a bell to anyone? Gosh, I don't want to know how much that man has made off that pyramid. In any case, I really appreciated the chance to develop our own model as a class.

towey said...

Just to add something else to this post (which I enjoyed reading!), I have really enjoyed this class. I am planning on going into the business side of the music industry and think that these new marketing programs can be easily applied to music. When it comes down to it, the only way to find out about music that extends beyond the 4 songs played on the radio, I usually hear about it from friends. Either through websites they recommend me to or through songs that they'll send me online.

Also, I am starting my co-op at Atlantic Records in two weeks and found the guest lecture from pod design interesting because he explained that Atlantic had already used their company in a campaign for The Darkness' website.

Walter Carl said...

Hi everyone! I just posted about this model on my research blog. Thanks for all the excellent feedback!