Monday, June 05, 2006

My compilation post: Guest speaker Jim Nail and Discussion Boards



-->To put it simply, I like to talk. I have my phone calling my best friend while IMing my sister and posting on one of the few discussion boards I participate in. I talk. I talk a lot. Where about 65% of my talking is useless banter, gossip, and checking in with family and friends, the other 35% I reserve for discussion boards, these blogs (anything that basically is intended for the spread of info). Please note I dont keep to these statistics; they are just rough figures I pulled from the top of my head. Keeping my enthusiasm for discussion in mind, I was interested to hearing what Jim Nail, Chief Strategy and Marketing Officer for Cymphony said about Blogs. I had not entered into the blogosphere until this course and had stuck primarily to discussion boards (mostly centered on boards for Spinning Instructors) so it has been interesting for me to learn about the impact and power of blogs. I do wonder, and I pose this question for people to comment on: What is the relation between discussion boards and blogs? Do you think that the rules and ethics we have learned for blogs can be applied to discussion boards? Do boards have as much power for WOM as blogs or is their impact of a different nature?

I've been thinking about this for awhile and I am torn between my opinions. I think that discussion boards have a lot of the same characteristics of blogs, but these often tend to be connected to companies and are much less often connected to people's personal websites. This seems to be a large difference between the two. My own experience with the two also have differences. The discussion boards I participate in are to share information and experiences about Spinning (or indoor cycling for those that are unfamiliar) which is helpful because I am an instructor. Most of the posts, though some are rants about gym politics and rude members, are to share ideas about music, rides, and our experiences within the program. These threads are mostly positive. Blogs on the other hand have the ability to be negative as we learned through Jim who sited Walmart and Chevy as prime examples. I appreciated hearing the information he had to share because I think he did a fabulous job of pulling everything we've learned thus far together within his presentation. Kudos. He had great insight and really proved to know his stuff and be a presence in the blogosphere. Had time allowed in class, I would have posed my question to him, but seeing as though we are all becoming more and more knowledgeable about WOM, I think our class has the ability to discuss the relationship. Comment on....
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5 comments:

tanyak said...

I don't think I'm qualified to comment on this question, because I do not have much experience with disscusion boards. That said... I think the difference is that discussion boards are private? The only discussion board I'm a part of are the ones for this class, Athletics Group 2. And things that are posted on there are limited to those who have access to our blackboard class. I do not know if all discussion boards are private though.
And obviously, the opposite of that is public blogs.
But this is a guess. I'm not sure.

JStephens said...

Ever since we started this class I was wondering the same thing, what really is the difference between discussion boards and blogs? The only real thing I knew about blogs before this class was that they were used in the 2004 Presidential elections. But I had seen a bunch of discussion boards on band websites, TV sites, and more. I kind of see blogging as becoming more dominant, almost a world in itself. Blogging enthusiasts seem obsessed with the concept, and there's actual well known bloggers in the field. As we know, there's text books, scholarly articles, and publishable magazines all with the prime focus of blogging. I don't think there's really anything like that with discussion boards. They seem more informal to me and only for fans/consumers. I doubt there are "professional" or "well known" experts in the field of discussion boards. Pretty much what I'm trying to get at is blogging, as new as it is, has surpassed discussion boards and become an educational field in itself.

Jesols said...

We were actually discussing the differences between blogs and discussions boards today in our group, and to be honest I am still not all that sure of the differences. I feel that perhaps discussion boards are more community based and they are found on websites that deal with certain issues, such as spinning. This is just a thought, as I am still confused to the differences.

Walter Carl said...

Below are a couple posts (blog posts!) about the difference between message boards and blogs. Assuming that message boards and discussion boards are the same these might be useful for Stephanie's question...

Common Craft's post about the differences

Anders Jacobsen's post

Walter Carl said...

And here's another post about message boards versus blogs from a student in the Advanced Organizational Communication class from last term.